Gas Masks – How to Use Them

Whenever you use a gas mask, you will probably need several filters to change after every use. Not only do filters have a shelf life, but they also don’t last as long while in use as you might imagine. Most need to be replaced after just several hours of use depending on the environment and gas concentrations.

Even if breathing in “uninfected air,” they last less than 24 hours. What does this mean? First, it’s not hard to imagine the need for several filters per person depending on exposure times. Second, it’s important to keep track of the expiration date for any filters on hand. You can also buy the best filter gas masks via https://www.gasmaskpro.com/.

At $40-$50 a pop, the cost of replacement filters can add up quickly. I would suggest purchasing a mask that accepts 40mm NATO threaded filter canisters. These tend to be the most readily available and popular.  This filter canister was developed for the Israel Defense Force (IDF) to provide protection against all known NBC agents in the form of vapors and aerosols.

It is designed for military and civil defense use. It is specially designed for comfort and extended use at a minimal physiological load, having low breathing resistance and low weight. Its design assures optimal performance complying with all IDF specifications as well as the performance requirements of the American Army C2 filter canister.

Choking Agents and the Protection Against Them

The choking agent delivered as a gas cloud to the target area, where individuals become victims through steam inhalation. Toxic agents trigger the immune system, cause fluids to accumulate in the lungs, which can cause death through shortness of breath or lack of oxygen if the lungs are severely damaged.

The effect of the chemical agent, once an individual is exposed to the vapour, may be immediate or can take up to three hours. Protective gas masks are the best defence against choking agents. Choking agents were employed first by the German army and later by the Allied forces in World War I.

The first massive use of chemical weapons in that conflict came when the Germans released chlorine gas from thousands of cylinders along at Ypres, Belgium, on April 22, 1915, creating a wind-borne chemical cloud that opened a major breach in the lines of the unprepared French and Algerian units.

The Germans were not prepared to exploit the opening, which gave the French and Algerians time to rush reinforcements into the line. Eventually, both sides mastered the new techniques of using choking agents such as chlorine, phosgene, diphosgene, chloropicrin, ethyldichlorasine, and perfluoroisoboxylene and launched numerous attacks—though without any militarily significant breakthroughs once each side had introduced the first crude gas masks and other protective measures.